Muse Biofeedback – Research

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Research Studies on Meditating with Muse

1) In a study through Partners Healthcare’s Center for Connected Health, study participants who used Muse showed a measurable reduction in stress and increased resilience.

2) Dr. Norman Farb’s laboratory at the University of Toronto showed that six weeks’ regular use of Muse in healthy adults resulted in improvements in attention, as well as reduced somatic symptoms (headaches, pain, discomfort, etc.) on the Brief Symptom Inventory.

3) The laboratory of Prof. Michela Balconi at the Catholic University of Milan showed that four weeks with Muse created a physiological change akin to a more relaxed baseline brain state and improved cognitive performance, compared to controls.

Another Interesting study

To measure monks’ brain activity, Olav Krigolson’s team used a MUSE headband that records brain waves and displays them on a laptop in real time. The study of 27 monks recorded brain activity at rest, during meditation and while playing video games.

Researchers found that monks’ brains are still very active in meditation. Their analysis shows monks’ brains were more relaxed, focused and in sync during meditation compared to when they were at rest. Krigolson said his team has found meditation also has a “carry over effect.”

When Monks played video games after meditating, he noticed their neurons were more responsive to visual stimuli. These findings could be helpful in keeping the brain active as people grow older. Krigolson’s brain data suggests meditation would be a good idea to “stave off the effect of aging,” but he said more research is needed.

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